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  • Details of flowery fabric.
  • Examples of Pasold ladybird adverts.
  • Images of Pasold Ladybirds in space, using a 'computer', in a laborartory.
  • Pasold Research Fund Logo
  • Portion of fabric showing roses.
  • Textile History - publications from Pasold
  • The Pasold Research Fund publishes research monographs and essays - front cover images.

People

Pasold Governors    

  • Professor Giorgio Riello (Chair)
  • Mr Donald Anderson OBE
  • Professor Christopher Breward
  • Dr Mary Brooks
  • Ms Clare Browne
  • Professor Pat Hudson
  • Dr Alejandra Irigoin
  • Professor Lesley Miller
  • Professor Tirthankar Roy
  • Professor Katie Scott

Pasold Members

  • Professor Reggie Lee Blaszczyk
  • Dr Sarah Cheang
  • Dr Alice Dolan
  • Mr J. Dundas Hamilton CBE
  • Dr Negley B. Harte
  • Professor Maria Hayward
  • Dr Miles Lambert
  • Professor Beverly Lemire (International Member)
  • Professor Peter McNeil (International)
  • Dr David Mitchell
  • Professor Marie-Louise Nosch (International)
  • Dr Pam Parmal (International Member)
  • Dr Philip Sykas
  • Dr Sally Tuckett
  • Dr Laura Ugolini
  • Professor Evelyn Welch
  • Ms Helen Wyld

Director

Stana Nendic
Professor Stana Nenadic
stana.nenadic@ed.ac.uk
Stana Nenadic is Professor of Social and Cultural History at the University of Edinburgh.  She has researched and published on British material culture in the eighteenth and nineteenth centuries and has a particular interest in the Turkey red printed cotton textile industry.  Stana has worked extensively with museum collections and museum partners.  Her current project is on artisans and the craft economy in the nineteenth century.

Governors

Stana Nendic
Professor Giorgio Riello (Chair of Governors)
g.riello@warwick.ac.uk
Giorgio Riello is Professor of Global History and Culture at the University of Warwick. He has published extensively on early modern textiles, fashion, and material culture in Europe and Asia. He is the author of A Foot in the Past (OUP/Pasold, 2006), Cotton: The Fabric that Made the Modern World (CUP, 2013), and Luxury: A Rich History (OUP, 2016).
 
Donald Anderson
Donald Anderson OBE FRSE
donald.robertson.anderson@gmail.com
Donald Anderson was formally Chief Economist of Courtaulds plc. In this capacity, and as Chair of the Economic Policy Committee of the European Man-made Fibres Association, he was closely involved in the evolution of the MultiFibre Arrangement governing world trade in textiles, and was the UK Government’s industrial adviser at the World Trade Organisation negotiations in Seattle. His published work includes analyses of textile industry strategy in the context of developing globalisation, and of globalisation’s implications for international trade policy as a whole. Since retiring he has acted as an adviser on economic diplomacy in London, Edinburgh and Washington. He is a former Chair of the Society of Professional Economists, and a Fellow of the Royal Society of Edinburgh.
 
Chris Breward
Professor Christopher Breward
cbreward@nationalgalleries.org
Christopher Breward is Director of Collection and Research at the National Galleries of Scotland. He was formerly Principal of Edinburgh College of Art at the University of Edinburgh, where he now holds a Visiting Professorship. Before working in Edinburgh Christopher was Head of Research at the Victoria and Albert Museum. His personal research interests lie in the field of fashion history and he has published widely on fashion's relation to masculinity, metropolitan cultures and concepts of modernity.
 
Dr Mary Brooks
Dr Mary Brooks
mary.brooks@durham.ac.uk
Following her training as a textile conservator at the Textile Conservation Centre at Hampton Court Palace, Mary worked in America and England undertaking both conservation and curatorial roles. In 1998 she returned to the Textile Conservation Centre as Head of Studies and Research and subsequently became Reader and Programme Leader for their MA Museum & Galleries at the University of Southampton. She was Acting Director of Studies, MA Cultural Heritage Management, University of York (2009-10) and Monument Fellow at York Castle Museum (2010-11). She is now at Durham University where she has implemented a new MA in International Cultural Heritage Management. Research interests include seventeenth-century embroideries and the use of X-radiography for the greater understanding of textiles and dress. She was joint editor of the journal Textile History from 2009-2015.
 
Ms Clare Browne 
clarewbrowne@gmail.com
Clare Browne is an independent textile historian with research interests in medieval and early modern British and European textiles. She was a Curator of Textiles at the Victoria and Albert Museum, London, for 30 years, where she is now an Honorary Senior Research Fellow, and is also a Directing Council member of CIETA (Centre International d’Etude des Textiles Anciens).
 
Professor Pat Hudson 
hudsonp@cardiff.ac.uk
Pat Hudson was Director of the Pasold Research Fund between 2006 and 2010 and is Professor Emerita of Economic and Social History at Cardiff University. She has researched and published on industrialisation in Britain, on pre-factory manufacturing, the family economy and demographic change in the eighteenth and early nineteenth centuries, as well as on the role of quantitative analysis in historical work.
 
Dr Alejandra Irigoin 
m.a.irigoin@lse.ac.uk
Dr Alejandra Irigoin is an Associate Professor in Economic History at the London School of Economics. Here research interests include early modern global economic and monetary history; economic history of Latin America, especially in the colonial period and the comparative political economy of Empire.
 
Professor Lesley Miller
Professor Lesley Miller 
le.miller@vam.ac.uk
Lesley Miller is Senior Curator of Textiles and Fashion at the Victoria and Albert Museum, London and Professor of Dress and Textile History at the University of Glasgow. She is responsible for the care and interpretation of the Museum’s collections of textiles dating to before 1800, and teaches on the University’s MLitt in Dress ant Textile Histories. Her personal research interests lie in French and Spanish textiles and dress (design, commerce and manufacturing), her main publications being Selling Silks. A Merchant’s Sample Book 1764 (V&A, 2014) and Balenciaga: Shaping Fashion (V&A, 2017). She is a Vice President of CIETA (Centre International d’Etude des Textiles Anciens).
 
Professor Tirthankar Roy
T.Roy@lse.ac.uk
Professor Roy is an economic historian of modern and early-modern South Asia and his particular interests include industrialization, labour and employment, and historiography. He has published widely on the history of textiles in the Indian subcontinent, in particular on weavers and on the cotton textile trade.
 
Professor Katie Scott
katie.scott@courtauld.ac.uk
Katie Scott studied the history of art at University College London, from where she gained both a BA and a PhD. She has taught at The Courtauld Institute of Art since 1988. A specialist in French art and architecture of the early modern period, Katie Scott’s is the author of The Rococo Interior (Yale University Press, 1996). She is currently preparing a book length study on the origin of copyright and patent in the arts in early modern France.

Company Secretary and Treasurer

Dr Christine Boydell
Dr Christine Boydell
cboydell@dmu.ac.uk
Dr Christine Boydell is Senior Honorary Research Fellow at De Montfort University, Leicester, UK where she lectured for seventeen years. She is a design historian with a special interest in the history of twentieth century fashion and textiles and has published widely on these subjects, including several books: Horrockses Fashions: Off the Peg Style in the ’40 and ‘50s, The Architect of Floors: modernism, art and Marion Dorn designs and Disentangling Textiles (with Mary Schoeser). She has also curated a number of exhibitions including Horrockses Fashions at the Fashion & Textile Museum, London (2010) and ‘Taking the Plunge’ and ‘Riviera Style’, exhibitions devoted to the history of swimwear. She has worked as a consultant for Leicestershire Museums and Keele University.